A seven-year-old orphaned Lakota boy plays a major role in the events leading up to the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

Takini, a young Lakota boy, seems to have received special powers from Wakan Tanka, the Great Mystery. Time after time he miraculously escapes danger from a charging Great Bear, a raging river, capture by an enemy tribe, and close encounters with "bluecoats" - United States Government soldiers. 

Chief Sitting Bull adopts Takini and watches as he receives messages from a hawk. Takini finds a faithful dog and tames a cranky horse. Together the three friends survive many adventures. But when Takini and Friendly discover a plan to attack the Indian villages and race to warn Sitting Bull, they almost lose their lives. Will Wakan Tanka protect them or is it time for Takini to give his life to save the tribe?

Takini is the ninth book in the Amazing Indian Children Series.


The Truth About Sacajawea is an accurate paraphrase of the journal accounts that mention Sacajawea or "the Sqar," as she was often called. This entry-by-entry approach allows readers to experience what the explorers wrote about Sacajawea. Between the journal accounts is a short commentary and a brief synopsis of events that took place between the entries.
Sacajawea, a sixteen-year-old Shoshoni Indian girl, and her husband, Toussaint Charbonneau, were hired on as guides and interpreters when the Corps of Discovery led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark left their winter quarters in the center of North Dakota and began their epic trek to the Pacific Ocean.

Jean Baptiste Charbonneau was about eight weeks old when his mother strapped his cradleboard on her back and the journey began. Young mother and infant endured many hardships on the history-making trip.

The physically abused young mother proved to be "indepensable" to the success of one of the greatest explorations in all of American history. Her negotiation skills, translations abilities, awareness of Indian culture, familiarity with the territory and its flora and fauna, and her almost daily provision of roots, berries, and herbs made her a respected member of the group.

Since the end of the expedition, much has been written about this amazing teenager. Unfortunately most of the writings are full of myth, legend, and historically inaccurate information.

Confusion about Sacajawea's valuable role evaporates when the source of the facts about her - The Lewis and Clark Journals - are consulted. The two captains wrote much about her contributions as they carefully and precisely documented all events of the expedition.

The Truth About Sacajawea is an accurate paraphrase of the journal accounts that mention Sacajawea or "the Sqar," as she was often called. This entry-by-entry approach allows readers to experience what the explorers wrote about Sacajawea. Between the journal accounts is a short commentary and a brief synopsis of events that took place between the entries.
The concise, clear and accurate account of the twenty-one months Sacajawea spent with Lewis and Clark is a reliable picture of this quietly resourceful teenager and the enormous contributions she made to this famous expedition.

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